Musicians Collaboration Studio

when should i normalize

griffo · 4 · 1081
 

Offline griffo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
    • Posts: 349
  • be good and stay normal............
    • stillworkin
hi guys my ususal prosesses  for vocals is to find a tune i like write some lyrics and lay down a voc track i always  normalize the music track and  i  normalize the vocals before i hear it back is this the right way or the wrong way or does it realy matter  with my vocals  normalized is it harder to  tweak it  or mix it ?
let me know your thoughts cheers griffo
without music life is.......?


Offline Bobby Watson

  • Super Hero
  • ******
    • Posts: 2497
  • What's a band without members?
    • Backporch Dreams
Audio normalization is the application of a constant amount of gain to an audio recording to bring the amplitude to a target level without clipping. It won't harm the track. If you are normalizing individual tracks it might simply raise "or lower" the input gain of tracks you import into your DAW. If a track was recorded at a low level it will bring up the input gain. Normalizing a mixed track can raise the gain level of the outputted file. Some folks normalize all the songs on a project together to reduce the possibility of some songs being louder or quieter so you aren't grabbing the volume knob throughout the listening to all of them. It can or can't be your friend. Just my take on it.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2020, 11:34:41 PM by Bobby Watson »


Offline griffo

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
    • Posts: 349
  • be good and stay normal............
    • stillworkin
thanks bobby 
without music life is.......?


Offline napoleonboot

  • Super Hero
  • ******
    • Posts: 3074
It's best to adjust the gain of your mic pre-amp before recording so that the vocal level is peaking at somewhere between -3dB and -1dB.

If you record before normalisation at a sigificantly lower level than this (say peaking at -10db or lower) before normalisation then you have already caused damage; normalising it adds no further damage. If you record at a bit depth of 32bits rather than 24 or 16 then you cause less damage recording at low levels, but my rule of thumb for the peaks still holds to get the optimum quality.

If you record with peaks bouncing up to 0db, then you will be clipping which sounds harsh and certainly reduces quality and quickly can make your recording useless for any proper quality output, and cant really be fixed in the mix (there are some treatments to lessen it's impact but they have other side effects on the sound quality).

Sorry if that's too techy to be of use. I did my degree in electronic communication engineering. If you want a simple version, don't let the needle hit the top of the dial and don't let it hover near the bottom all the way through (or in the bottom half). Aim to keep it roughly between 50% and 80% of available travel.


Regards
George
« Last Edit: July 08, 2020, 04:36:38 PM by napoleonboot »
George can often be found playing stringy things, and singing...


 

Powered by EzPortal